KADAVER XQUISIT / DER SCHÖNE UND DIE BIEST - Split-CD

Kadaver Xquisit / Der Schöne und die Biest - Split-CD

6 songs
17:18 minutes
***** ***
(self-released)

KX page / dSudB Ppge

Well over ten years ago, we reviewed the debut EP by Singsong-Girl, the electro pop project of Tamara Kapp, a Luxembourgish artist living in Germany. Since then she released two more records under that name with truly charming music, but she also seems to have a fiercer side. On this here split release between Kadaver Xquisit and Der Schöne und die Biest, she is playing the drums and partly also singing. We get three songs from each artist, always alternating between one band and the other.

Kadaver Xquisit is a archetypical German punk band that sounds like they were still caught in the early Eighties, and the guys also all look like being well into their forties. Their sound is rather direct, feeling like recorded live straight into a microphone. The vocals, most of them by Commandante Grimm, truly sound grim, and on the track Weiter so! we get Tamara taking over the microphone. That song is the fastest and shortest one on this EP, while the other two tracks, especially Leithammel surprises with a really good sequence of melodies and catchy parts that make this a true underground punk classic.

Der Schöne und die Biest is a sludge punk duo consisting of Tamara Kapp on drums and vocals, and Carsten Fänger on bass. The latter grew tired of playing in mathcore bands, and backed with Tamara Kapp’s drumming which is anything but technically skilful but has all the power to drive the music forward, they come with a more brutal sound. The vocals have fewer instruments to compete with and have a certain Nina Hagen flair, especially on the anti-consumerist Nehmt.

Both bands have great lyrics, with Der Schöne und die Biest having maybe a little more literary depth, but that’s also possibly because they more or less borrowed their themes from other artists like Florent Pagny and Stella. This split EP is an entertaining and short lo-fi listening experience that should appeal to all those who are tired of punk having been too polished for quite a few years now. One might prefer first one band and then the other instead of the alternating order, but everyone is free to choose their own playing order in this digital age.

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