PRESSOR - Weird Things

Pressor - Weird Things

4 songs
28:22 minutes
***** ***
(no name)

Bandpage

One would usually expect a sludge metal band to come from the USA, but that genre has transcended national borders, so that you can come across such bands from all over the world. Take for instance Pressor from Kostroma, a town lying a little over 300 kilometres north-east of Moscow. The quartet has been around for about ten years, and has released in that time an EP, a bootleg and a split. Weird Things is either their first short longplayer, or their second long EP, depending on how you feel like defining the format.

I have to admit that I usually donít listen so much to that genre, but for the sake of fairness, I put on my objective ears, and must say that I was positively surprised. The Russians started as a funeral doom death metal band, but over the years evolved into a stoned sludge metal band. What sets the quartet apart from other genre bands like Sleep, Eyehategod, Electric Wizard, etc. is that they add a lot of electronic gadgetry which gives their music a rather psychedelic bent.

The opener Heavy State, at five minutes the shortest track, is an instrumental piece starting with weird noises before turning into an abrasive sludge fest with a lava-like down-tempo that makes it sound a little like a funeral march. Up until that moment I thought they might be an instrumental band, but the following nearly eight-minute-long title track has harsh vocals that really fit well with the music. The first few minutes of are actually quite fast and atypical, but soon the band adds a break that takes the speed out of the song, giving it a certain early Type O Negative feeling. Tripping Deep is at nearly ten minutes the recordís longest track and gives its title justice. This is totally freaked out sludge metal with a plodding pace and shared vocals between the two guitarists. The strangely titled Hexadecimal Unified Insanity is at nearly six minutes a shorter piece again, and once again offers some more of the trippy stoner sludge.

What I really like about Weird Things is the powerful yet grating production that is transparent and dirty at the same time. Pressor are definitely still an underground band, and that is a good thing. Unlike many more popular sludge bands that have eyed with blues elements for instance, Pressor perform their own brand of sludge, refined with hypnotic electronic sounds that give them a certain Seventies flair. The more visually inclined among you will find the entire album set to a psychedelic video projection on YouTube. Those who want their sludge black and without sugar should get a sonic equivalent of a caffeine kick with Weird Things.

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